Fifty-Two Frames: Reflecting

Last week I put in over two hours experimenting with reflection photography advice I found here. After vigorously cleaning a giant mirror, setting up a black sheet tent, trying out different ‘subjects’, using Lego pieces to hold up the photos, taking 38258276245 photos to come up with the right angle… I think I learned a lot this week, even if I’m not totally satisfied with the outcome. (I think it lacks direction…)

Week 7: Reflecting

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.” ― Søren Kierkegaard 

Fifty-Two Frames: Reflections.

This week’s photo inspired by our getaway last week. Which feels like a year ago, since I’m already sick, my kids aren’t sleeping through the night, I have a ton of work on my plate, and well, it’s raining a lot.

Bla bla life is so hard when just last week we wined and dined with no kids around.

How many glasses does it take to enjoy a night of adult conversation, speculation and reflection – away from the kids?

Why I made aliyah: My new answer.

It’s been a long couple of weeks. I haven’t had much to say and haven’t been wanting to think about the news. I’m currently a bachelorette living in this big apartment since my roommate went to Australia for two weeks. I’ve got a lot of school work to do and a lot of work work to do.

Not complaining; I’m enjoying my situation right now. When I hear about friends trying to cut it in America, paying that god-awful rent and keeping up with terribly high standards of living… I really do appreciate what I have built here. Could I have been this successful if I had lived in New York? I really don’t know. There’s so much about me that is calmer and more focused here.

I think I’ve come to the point where I realize I’m now here more for the conditions of my life than the ideological reasons from 2005. My lifestyle, my job, my school, my friends, my inter(national)marriage all keep me here more than a philosophical desire or religious dream. I do still believe in it, but I think I have a lot of new things I believe in now, too.

Which is why I always find it funny how people who have been living here for around 3 years seem to have a ‘new answer’ to why they made aliyah. Ask an oleh (not chadash) point-blank, and they will pause, possibly squirm, sigh, and tell you, “Well, the new answer is…”

I’m very grateful at how things have turned out for me; I know it’s usually the opposite for a lot of people. My key is to take it all one day at a time, or at the very least, not think more than six months ahead. That way, when you ask me why I made aliyah, I can continuously look back, reflect and be prepared to tell you what my ‘new answer’ is.