All the books we must read

I’m about to say the most suburban, stereotypical, adult thing I have ever said, but… well… here goes: In my book club this month,

Ok, that wasn’t so bad.

In my book club this month, we read All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. I had never heard of it before, being as out of it as I am, but it won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2015. So it’s kind of a big deal. I didn’t even realize that before opening the book, even though it’s right there on the front cover.

I started reading it and within pages, could not stop. This is the type of book you start reading because you saw it on the table, knew book club meeting is in a few days, need to procrastinate everything else, and forget you had a miles-long to-do list before you reach page 265 and realize you’ve forgotten you have a life outside of an orphanage in World World II Germany.

Anyway.

This book couldn’t have come at a weirder or more appropriate time. Donald Trump has made an entire first world country crazy. Brexit was literally happening while I read about the demise of Europe. Things in Israel are heating up again. Elie Weisel passed away at 87.

I absolutely adore this book – Doerr treats language like fine cooking… just enough this, not too much that. The language was beautiful – in the way I actually stopped in my tracks every 50 pages or so when I came across a line so perfect I had to stop and read it again and again. The characters are well-developed, imperfect, unexpected and I can’t help caring about each one.

And the plot lent itself to a healthy dose of good, classic storytelling.

There are so many themes and metaphors and philosophical musings displayed throughout the novel. Light. Technology. Awareness. Belonging. Mental health. Here are some of the book’s themes that have been stuck in my mind since:

Parenting during war:

“Isn’t life a kind of corruption? A child is born, and the world sets in upon it. Taking things from it, stuffing things into it.”

“There is a humility of being a father to someone so powerful, as if he were only a narrow conduit for another, greater thing. That’s how it feels right now, he thinks, kneeling beside her, rinsing her hair: as though his love for his daughter will outstrip the limits of his body. The walls could fall away, even the whole city, and the brightness of that feeling would not wane.”

“This, she realizes, is the basis of all fear. That a light you are powerless to stop will turn on you and usher a bullet to its mark.”

Communication:

“Radio: it ties a million ears to a single mouth. Out of loudspeakers all around Zollverein, the staccato voice of the Reich grows like some imperturbable tree; its subjects lean toward its branches as if towards the lips of God. And when God stops whispering, they become desperate for someone who can put things right.”

“To shut your eyes is to guess nothing of blindness. Beneath your world of skies and faces and buildings exists a rawer and older world, a place where surface planes disintegrate and sounds ribbon in shoals through the air.”

Standing up:

“How do you ever know for certain that you are doing the right thing?”

“All your life you wait, and then it finally comes, and are you ready?”

“Seventy-six years old, and I can still feel like this? Like a little girl with stars in my eyes?”

Fear-stoking, other-blaming:

“You know the greatest lesson of history? It’s that history is whatever the victors say it is. That’s the lesson. Whoever wins, that’s who decides the history. We act in our own self-interest. Of course we do. Name me a person or a nation who does not. The trick is figuring out where your interests are.”

“Is it right to do something only because everyone else is doing it?”

“Sometimes the eye of a hurricane is the safest place to be.”

“What the war did to dreamers.”

With Elie Wiesel’s death occurring just days after I finished… with all the talk of war and horror and hate in the world today… this line perhaps is what we’re left with if we plan to take heed:

“Every hour, she thinks, someone for whom the war was memory falls out of the world.”

Fifty-Two Frames: Books

Recently, our town added a completely cute new feature to our bus stops: book shelves!

 

I started to read random books to my kids while killing time after gan. What a lovely example.

Week 21: Books

“A new book smells great. An old book smells even better. An old book smells like ancient Egypt.” – Ray Bradbury 

The potty process (or, toilet-training literature).

Toilet-training has officially begun. It unofficially began way before Koala was even two years old and took a serious interest in all the peeing Mama was doing (pregnant, perhaps).

But in the laid-back fashion that my life is stitched in, we didn’t really try too hard. We let Koala explore the facts of toilet-training. He’d sit on it if he asked, he’d just watch or stand in the bathroom if he felt like it.

But last week, it started getting serious… so we did, too.

Which is when I realized something: For a while, we’ve hosted potty-friendly literature in the bathroom: Alona Frankel’s ever-helpful Once Upon a Potty and the ever-role model Elmo’s Potty Time With Elmo. Also, by chance, the 50s-inspired photo book, When Food Was Fun is available.

Koala’s toilet library: Isn’t that a funny selection, given what happens to food after it was fun? It’s like, “here’s what you do on the potty – and here’s how you can remember how awesome it was before you have to go through all this shit.”

Ma’ase B’chamisha Googlim: Google’s logo for Miriam Rut.

Google Israel has a cutie logo today in honor of Miriam Rut‘s birthday (1910-2005).

Mi zot? Aside from an educator and gannenet, she is known as the author of tons of Israeli classic children’s books, including  תירס חם, the more recent hit יובל המבלבל, and the ever-classic מעשה בחמישה בלונים, depicted in the logo:

The logo is in the style of Ora Eyal, illustrator for many Israeli classics including the ones listed above.

It’s nice to see local love!

DYK? Australian Etiquette dictates…

I’m enjoying the bizarrity of finding this book at the State Library of Victoria today:

Published in 1885, it’s pretty thorough on the type of behavior expected from true-blue Aussie ladies and gentlemen. How to propose marriage, how to accept or reject them. How to grow your beard, how to deal with hangnails.

I like today’s Australia better – struth!

That’s a lot of Keret.

Have I mentioned that I totally dig Etgar Keret?

In college I took a creative writing class that focused on ‘short short stories.’ Like, really short. Micro short. Blogger short.

Ever since reading The Bus Driver Who Wanted To Be God I realized that this guy was doing what I wanted to be doing with short stories. And so, I started following him. And everything he’s written…

…in English. Until last week. I had it on my to-do list to grab a copy of צנורות, Keret’s first published collection of shorts, in Hebrew. I’ve only read the translated stuff and I thought if anything, his stuff will be a breeze to read in Hebrew.

Last week I stopped by צומת ספרים (yes, there is another popular Israeli bookstore chain aside from Steimatsky!). The store was having a ‘buy 1 get 2’ sale. I knew Keret’s new book came out recently but I also knew there was no way it would be part of the sale. What I found out shortly after knowing all that other stuff was: three of his older collections were… so I brought a copy of each up to the cashier.

She looked up at me and exclaimed, “Oh, isn’t he just amazing?! Have you read his new one yet?” I told her I’ve actually only read the others in English, so now I’m going to try them in Hebrew. She gave me props and told me the new one was also on sale, 30 shekel, how could a diehard not pick that up?

So I did. Four-books-for-the-price-of-two later and I’m steeped in Etgar Keret short storyness for a while.

By the way, I was right. His stuff is a breeze to read in Hebrew. So if you’re an oleh wondering where to start with that, Keret is a grand place. And I highly recommend צנורות.